Are Aluminium Windows and Doors Secure?

Sadly, in current times this is high on the list of questions we get asked. Everyone is conscious of making sure that their house and family is as safe as possible, but many customers aren’t aware of the stringent European regulations and BSI standards that exist to safeguard their security.

Pressure from regulators and standards agencies has ensured that aluminium windows and doors are as secure as possible, and our windows are no exception.

Our system supplier has one of the best testing facilities in the world. Every single window and door system is thoroughly tested for every conceivable standard. But in-house testing is not where the story ends. Each product must then go through a recognised independent testing company.

Companies like Chiltern Dynamics, BSI Group and Wintech Engineering are members of UKAS (United Kingdom Accreditation Service) and are used to independently answer the question: Are Aluminium Windows and Doors Secure?

How is security tested?

Below we explain the type of tests that Wintech used to test our Reynaers 75 Eco window system. This is our entry-level window system.

The window tested was approximately 800mm wide x 1300mm high with a full opening top hung vent.

The lock used was a Mach 3 shoot-bolt with a central keep and keeps at each corner. Standard Friction Hinges were also used and secured with the relevant screws.

The tools used in the tests are listed below:

Group A Group B
Tool Used Quantity Tool Used Quantity
Mild steel wire Wood chisel (25mm blade) 1
Credit cards 2 Wood chisel (6mm blade) 1
Craft knife 1 Flat blade screwdriver 1
Flat blade screwdrivers 2 Brick bolster 1
Paint scrapers 2 Philips screwdriver (point size 2) 1
Pozidrive screwdriver (point size 2) 1

 

A series of parallel-to-plane loads and perpendicular-to-plane loads were applied to the window in accordance with the Specification.

The parallel-to-plane loads were applied using hydraulic cylinders located on the side of the test rig, which could be adjusted to be in alignment with the loading point.

The perpendicular-to-plane loads were applied using hydraulic cylinders, which generated the required loads.

Each load was applied and removed in a period of no more than 5 minutes.

 

Test 1 – Manipulation Test

The sample was mounted vertically in the test rig and the test was carried out using only the tools described.

During the test, no entry could be gained within the allowable time period, and as such the window has PASSED the requirements of that specification.

Are aluminium windows and doors secure?
Group A Attack

 

Test 2 – Manual Glazing Removal

The sample was mounted vertically in the test rig and was tested using a selection of tools (Groups A & B). During the test, no entry could be gained within the allowable time period, and as such the window has PASSED the requirements of that specification.

Are aluminium windows and doors secure?
Group B Attack

 

Test 3 – Mechanical Glazing Removal

The sample was mounted vertically in the test rig, and a perpendicular-to-plane load of 2.0 kN was applied to each corner of the glazing in turn as specified.

Are aluminium windows and doors secure?
The 2.0 kN load being applied to one of the glazing corners of Eco 75

 

Test 4 – Mechanical Loading Test

The sample was mounted vertically in the test rig, and the test was carried out in accordance with the procedures detailed in the table below.

 

Are aluminium windows and doors secure?
Typical Load Points
Are aluminium windows and doors secure?
Eco 75 Load Table
Are aluminium windows and doors secure?
Eco 75 Load Sequence

 

Test 5 – Manual Check Test

The sample was mounted vertically in the test rig, and the test was carried out using the tools.  No entry was gained and so the product has PASSED the requirements of that Specification.


So you can see that we take the security of our Aluminium Windows and Doors very seriously.

If you would like to discuss security or any other topic in connection with our vast range of Reynaers Window and Door systems please comment below or call us on 0203 00 22 088.

 

This article is part of our Where Do I Start? series. To read the next article, please click here.

 

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